Football: Brotherhood between Leo Musso, D’Cota Dixon translates to success on field

first_imgIt is evident the camaraderie between Dixon, a junior strong safety, and Musso, a fifth-year free safety, have carried their bond onto the gridiron. The duo have accounted for nine of the Badgers’ 21 interceptions, Musso with five and Dixon with four.Some interceptions have been more important than others. Dixon’s first one of the season, against Louisiana State University during the season opener, sealed the game. Musso’s latest, which came on Saturday against Purdue, was mostly inconsequential but his one-handed catch made highlight reels. After Musso’ second interception against Illinois, Dixon immediately found his buddy on the sidelines and excitedly proclaimed:“Who the best safeties in this country?!”Football: Breakdown of Badgers’ upset over LSUThe Wisconsin Badgers played a spoiler game against fifth ranked Louisiana State University with a 16-14 upset victory in college Read…In the team’s comeback win over the University of Minnesota, Musso’s interception in the back of end zone sparked a four interception performance in the second half and led the Badgers to their 21 unanswered points. Despite losing by double digits for the first time in 23 games at halftime, Musso grabbed Paul Bunyan’s Axe and gave an inspiring speech that woke up the team going into the second period.The safety position, thought to be the biggest question marks on the UW defense, if not the entire team, has evolved into one of its strengths, thanks to the efforts from Musso and Dixon.Dixon, when asked whether or not he and Musso are the best pair of safeties in the nation, stood firm in his belief.“I feel like we’re the best at what we do,” Dixon said. “I’m not thinking about anybody else being better than me, so of course.”When asked what exactly they are best at, the experienced veteran made it as cut and dry as it comes.“Keepin’ them out the end zone,” Dixon said. “Win games for our team. That’s what we do. Making turnovers is just part of it. It’s not about me. It’s not about Leo. It’s not about any individual on this team.”Football: Leo Musso’s halftime speech, defensive stinginess in second half keep Paul Bunyan’s Axe in Madison for 13th straight yearLeo Musso studied the faces of his teammates on the University of Wisconsin football team and saw expressions of shock. Read…Their friendship, both on and off the field, began last season when they were both backing up the departed Michael Caputo and Tanner McEvoy. The paths they took to that point were so different, yet resembled each other.Dixon, a black man, fought his way out of poverty from Florida, then battled injuries and position changes once at UW. Musso, a white, Waunakee, Wisconsin native, was one of the state’s best high school running backs statistically, but endured a shift to safety and years of waiting in the wings before he got his shot. In this time of divisiveness in the U.S., their story of friendship provides hope in what some seem as a dark time.But it was in those practices last season with the second team, though, they realized their potential to become playmakers on the field.“The kind of guys we are and the mentality that we bring to the game helped us gel well together,” Musso said. “We know what to expect out of each other. I think more than anything, we trust one another. That’s I guess what’s kinda been the key to our success.”Earlier last week, UW head coach Paul Chryst raved about Musso, not just about his play but the way he carries himself as a teammate, calling him “a tremendous leader, a guy everyone could go to.”Dixon also sees that in Musso. As to why Musso has developed into that role, he says it’s because of his roots.“I’m a Wisconsin kid,” Musso said. “I take a lot of pride in playing for this school and playing for my home state, obviously growing up 15 minutes away from here. I guess I just kind of a good feel for what Wisconsin’s all about … we’re built up of no five-star dudes, very seldom four-star dudes, just no-star, two-star group of guys. And we have to rely on being smart, tough and dependable, as cliche as it sounds, that’s really all you can rely on.”Musso’ collegiate career has a life span of just three more games at most. At the end of the season, one chapter of the Musso-Dixon will close. Dixon says he tries not to think about it. He’ll have one year left, and he’ll have to do it without his brother.If he wanted to give Musso a going away present, what would it be? A Big Ten title? A special memento?“A smile,” Dixon said.“The wins, the gifts, the presents, it will all fade away, you know what I’m saying?” he said. “As a brother, I try to give him something more than that — some genuine love that stays with you for years.”The two now put their friendship and dominance to the test as they travel to Indianapolis to take on No. 7 Penn State University in the Big Ten Championship game. As two guys who have been around for a couple of years, they will look to erase the memory of the last time the Badgers went to Indianapolis in 2013, a crushing defeat to Ohio State University. The word “brotherhood” is thrown around loosely while describing teammates on a football team. Too often, that true weight of the term pales insignificant when compared to the actual definition.But what if two teammates, who come from completely different backgrounds and walks of life, form a bond so close they become just that — brothers? Such is the case with the University of Wisconsin football team’s starting safeties Leo Musso and D’Cota Dixon.“We’re like brothers,” Dixon said. “We genuinely care about each other. I think it’s one of those relationships where you meet someone in college and you have a lifetime friendship with them.”last_img read more

New spinout company to tackle drugresistant infections with novel antibiotics

first_img Developing epidermicin for commercial use Discovering additional sources for new classes of antibiotics Using Artificial Intelligence to improve antibiotic properties, working with Ingenza, IBM and the National Physical Laboratory Developing efficient techniques to manufacture antibiotics at scale in partnership with Ingenza Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskIn a relevant infection model, a single dose of epidermicin was as effective as six doses of the current standard of care. The antibiotic was initially recovered from a skin bacterium named Staphylococcus epidermidis, but can now be produced in a microbe suitable for industrial scale-up, using synthetic biology methods developed by Ingenza, which has a stake in the new business.Professor Upton initially developed the patented technology working closely with UMI3 Ltd at The University of Manchester, which also takes a stake in the new business.Professor Mathew Upton, chief scientific officer of Amprologix and part of the University of Plymouth School of Biomedical Sciences, said: “It is very exciting to form a new company to take forwards our portfolio of novel antimicrobial compounds. Epidermicin, our lead candidate antibiotic, has excellent potential for treating and preventing serious, drug resistant infections. With our current team, the company will be the ideal vehicle to take epidermicin to the clinic.”The World Health Organisation warned in February this year that ‘antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today’, so to have this company established is the next step to helping tackle the problem.”Neil Crabb, chief executive of Frontier IP, said: “We are delighted to work with Amprologix to commercialize these potentially life-saving antibiotics, and with a leading industrial partner in the area. It is further sign our business model is gaining traction with universities and industry alike.”Dr Ian Fotheringham, managing director of Ingenza, said: “This unique partnership fully exploits the synergy of Ingenza’s versatile bio-manufacturing technologies and Amprologix’s lead in discovering exciting new antimicrobial classes, spearheaded by Dr Upton’s innovative research.” Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 24 2018Drug-resistant infections are set to kill more people than cancer by 2050. Now a new University of Plymouth spinout company has been established to help tackle the problem – by developing new antibiotics and bringing them to market.Launched in collaboration with University intellectual property partners, Frontier IP, Amprologix will develop and commercialize the work of Professor Mathew Upton, Professor in Medical Microbiology at the University’s Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMed).A UK government review in 2015 estimated that by 2050, the global cost of antibiotic resistance will rise to US$100 trillion and drug resistant infections will cause 10 million deaths a year, eclipsing the current toll from cancer and diabetes combined.In the UK alone, the government estimates there are currently 5,000 deaths each year because antibiotics no longer work for some infections.The first product from the company is expected to be a cream containing epidermicin, one of the new antibiotics being developed to combat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Epidermicin can rapidly kill harmful bacteria including MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus), Streptococcus and Enterococcus at very low doses, even if they are resistant to other antibiotics.No new classes of antibiotics have been introduced into clinical use for the past 30 years, and the company is aiming to meet a growing need for new antibiotics as harmful microbes become increasingly drug resistant.Amprologix has already secured industry involvement through a partnership with world-leading biotechnology and synthetic biology company Ingenza.The new company is focused on four areas:center_img Source:https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/news/university-spinout-company-to-develop-new-antibioticslast_img read more