Governor Douglas Announces First Brownfields Grant

first_imgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:December 29, 2005Contact: David MaceVermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development(802) 828-5229GOVERNOR DOUGLAS AWARDS OVER $301,000 TO CITY OF MONTPELIER FOR BROWNFIELDS CLEANUP AND HOUSING PILOT PROJECTMONTPELIER Governor Jim Douglas announced over $301,000 in Community Development Program grants to the City of Montpelier, including the first grant designed to help clean up and develop contaminated property.Over half of this amount, $194,336, is the first award of Vermont Community Development Program (VCDP) funds for the Governors Vermont Brownfields Initiative.”I am very excited that these projects will help clean up a contaminated site for redevelopment within the downtown and create much needed affordable housing,” Governor Douglas said.The Vermont Brownfields Initiative was launched in April 2005 to expedite the clean-up and redevelopment of brownfields sites throughout the state.It is a collaboration of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development and the Agency of Natural Resources to bring together expertise in economic and community development as well as technical environmental review to bring forth well planned, properly financed projects that meet the needs of the community.The brownfields project in Montpelier will be using VCDP funds along with $187,933 in leveraged funds to assist in the clean up of hazardous materials found in the soils of property on Stonecutters Way in downtown Montpelier. Redevelopment and reuse of the cleaned-up property within two years is a requirement of the grant.The other award to the City of Montpelier, $106,700, will be used to initiate a pilot program called the One More Home Campaign, which will provide technical assistance and incentive grants to single family homeowners who are interested in adding accessory apartments within their homes or within a detached structure on their lot.The ultimate goal of the pilot program is to increase the stock of affordable housing throughout the city, consistent with the Governor’s Homes For Vermonters draft proposal.Governor Douglas stressed the dedication of community leaders and volunteers who work cooperatively with the State of Vermont to support and improve the quality of life for Vermonters.The Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development awards the competitive grants, based on recommendations of the Vermont Community Development Board and approval of Secretary Kevin Dorn.2005 Cycle III Implementation Grants$301,036 City of Montpelier: Grant to fund the One More Home Campaign, a public service program to provide technical assistance to single family homeowners to add accessory apartments to their homes. Grant to remediate brownfield sites at the former Salt Shed and adjacent Turntable Park on Stone Cutters Way. The remediation will enable redevelopment and re-use of both sites.For additional information about the Governors Vermont Brownfields Initiative, please see the Agency of Commerce and Community Development website at: http://www.dhca.state.vt.us/brownfields/index.htm(link is external). For information about the Vermont Community Development Program, please see the Agency of Commerce and Community Development website at: http://www.dhca.state.vt.us/VCDP/index.htm(link is external)last_img read more

Bar committee forms available in December

first_img Bar committee forms available in December The annual committee preference form for Bar members seeking appointments for the presidential term of President-elect Kelly Overstreet Johnson will again only be available on The Florida Bar’s Web site this year.The forms will be posted at www.flabar.org beginning December 1. If you do not have access to a computer, you may call (850) 561-5600, ext. 6802, and request a form to be mailed or faxed to you.To apply to serve on a committee, members will have to fill out the committee preference form and submit it online, eliminating the need to mail or fax in the completed form. It will be presented in the same format as usual and should only take a minute or two to complete and submit.The move to an electronic committee preference form is saving the Bar approximately $10,000 a year.“During the past several months, many of you have expressed a desire to serve on a committee of The Florida Bar,” Johnson said. “Now is the time to let me know of your continued interest by submitting your committee preference form.”Johnson said committee work is time-consuming and demanding, but is also extremely rewarding.“It provides an opportunity to have meaningful input into matters that are important to the public and our profession, and allows you to enjoy the company of lawyers throughout the state,” Johnson said. “If you submit a request to serve on a committee, I will assume you will devote the necessary time to be a fully participating member of the committee during your term.”There are roughly 500 appointments to be made, and typically 5,000 Bar members apply. Johnson said since the number of requests for appointments always exceeds the number of positions available, she will work to appoint people who have not previously had an opportunity to serve on Bar committees and will consider several factors, including previous history of service to the Bar and voluntary bar organizations.“Diversity in terms of gender, ethnicity, geography, and areas of practice will also be important,” Johnson said. “If you are presently serving on a committee, your level of participation and substantive contribution, together with the evaluation of committee chairs, will be carefully considered.”If you are currently serving on a standing committee, check the September 2003 directory issue of The Florida Bar Journal at pages 640 – 656 to determine when your term expires. If your term expires in 2004, you must complete a new form to be considered for reappointment. If you are not currently on a standing committee, and wish to be appointed, complete the form and return it prior to January 16, 2004. If you are serving on a substantive law committee and wish to continue to do so, you also must complete and return this form by January 16, 2004, to retain membership on that committee.“Only your readiness to volunteer your time and talent to our profession can keep the legal system strong for us and for the public that we are sworn to protect,” Johnson said. “I look forward to working with each of you in the coming year.” Bar committee forms available in Decembercenter_img November 15, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more

Credit union trade groups endorse CFPB advisory opinion plan; consumer groups oppose it

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » A Consumer Financial Protection Bureau proposal to allow financial services providers and trade groups to apply for advisory opinions would help bring more certainty to the regulatory process, credit union trade groups said last week.A coalition of consumer groups warned that the proposal would circumvent the regulatory process that is designed to protect consumers.In announcing the proposal in June, the CFPB said that the proposal, if adopted, would focus primarily on clarifying agency rules. “Under the program, parties will be able to request interpretive guidance, in the form of an [advisory opinion] to resolve such regulatory uncertainty,” the agency said.The proposal also would allow trade groups or outside counsel to submit a request on behalf of a group of clients or members without those entities being named.last_img read more

Help Young Long Islanders Find Places Here They Can Afford

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Shuprotim BhaumikMore than ever, Long Island residents are struggling to pay for housing. Since 1980, the Island has lagged behind regional competitors like Northern New Jersey and the Hudson Valley in residential construction. With comparatively little new housing stock and variety, home prices and rents in Long Island have soared. That has made those other areas more attractive to workers—especially younger ones—and the companies that seek them. According to the Long Island Index 2015 Survey, 62 percent of Long Islanders find it difficult to pay their monthly housing costs. That’s the highest percentage in 10 years of surveys. Fortunately, there’s a way to address the problem.The solution focuses on building multifamily housing in downtown areas, especially transit-oriented ones. Demographic projections show that more than two-thirds of new renters and buyers will want homes in mixed-use communities that are near shopping and public transit. Recent research that my firm conducted for the Long Island Index—contained in a new report titled “Long Island’s Needs for Multifamily Housing”—highlights strategies specific to the  communities of the Village of Babylon, the Hamlet of Hicksville, and the Village of Valley Stream, that, taken together, can provide a model for the rest of Long Island’s towns and villages.The case studies reveal that modest changes in zoning regulations would allow for higher density and smaller apartments. These zoning changes are just exemplary and do not assume that these three individual communities would necessarily make these changes. But they demonstrate the potential impact that modest changes in individual communities could have if implemented broadly enough. In addition to providing apartments at lower rents, these strategies also have the benefit of producing significantly more multifamily units than currently planned or proposed in Long Island, thereby making a dent in the estimated gap of up to 94,000 multifamily housing units needed on Long Island in the next 15 years.In Valley Stream, for instance, modest zoning changes could create almost 800 new, more affordable, multifamily housing units on just seven sites in the downtown area. The changes include establishing a minimum unit size of 850 square feet that responds to the needs of singles and smaller households, increasing maximum lot coverage to 60 percent, and increasing the maximum building height from three stories to four stories. These changes could potentially result in reductions in rent of nearly 50 percent by giving a young couple the option to rent an 850-square-foot apartment that is more appropriate for their lifestyle and needs instead of a 1500-square-foot unit that’s mandated under current zoning.In Hicksville, rezoning several commercial areas as multifamily residential ones, applying 50 percent lot coverage, and establishing new minimum unit sizes could generate over 1,900 new, more affordable, multifamily units. Similarly in Babylon, minor zoning changes—such as increasing density to 20-24 units per acre, establishing a building height limit of up to three stories, and increasing lot coverage to 50 percent—could provide room for more than 200 new, more affordable, multifamily units. The combined effect of these zoning changes could result in the reduction of rents of up to half, a significant economic boost to families in Long Island that are struggling to cover their housing costs.These are modest changes that are consistent with Long Island’s history of developing multifamily rental units in downtowns before the 1960s. Such developments today would help revitalize those downtowns and make them even more attractive to young people as well as businesses.Each community on Long Island must decide what course it will set. But failing to respond to the region’s high housing costs will mean that jobs and young people will continue to go elsewhere.Shuprotim Bhaumik, a resident of Syosset, is a partner at HR&A Advisors, which conducted research for the Long Island Index’s recent report, “Long Island’s Needs for Multifamily Housing.”last_img read more

Yankees’ Larry Rothschild takes the blame for team’s recent woes

first_img MLB trade news: Twins acquire reliever Sergio Romo from Marlins “It’s a matter of just continuing to dive in with each guy, where we can make small little adjustments, attacking the game plan in the best way possible,” manager Aaron Boone said. “Making sure we’re leaving no stone unturned as far as helping the guys make whatever little adjustments or subtle things that they need to change and also not overreacting to a bad week of baseball.”Sabathia said his poor start had everything to do with pitching too easily over the center of the plate and not cutting the corners properly. At 39, he says he should know better.James Paxton, who started Friday night and gave up seven runs, blamed his poor performance on making too many overall mistakes. MLB wrap: Blue Jays top Rays with walkoff home run from Teoscar Hernandez Larry Rothschild is shouldering the blame for the Yankees’ recent struggles.The team’s pitching coach said it was his fault the Yankees have lost three in a row, which included Saturday’s 9-5 loss to the Red Sox. MLB trade rumors: Dodgers considering pursuit of Blue Jays’ Marcus Stroman It hasn’t been just Sabathia and Green who haven’t been up to par. Over their past seven games, Yankees starters have a collective 16.62 ERA and have given up seven runs in seven games.“It’s not just one thing,” Rothschild said. ‘This doesn’t happen from just one thing. It’s different things from different guys but first-pitch strikes and things like that haven’t been good.”With each individual, you go by what you’ve seen and what needs to get corrected. We talk about it. If it’s something mechanical, pitch-wise, grip-wise — whatever — we do it in the bullpen and try to correct it there.”The Yankees were one of the hottest teams in the league and still are eight games ahead of the Red Sox in the AL East for the first-place spot with a 66-38 record. However, the loss to Boston pulled the Red Sox ahead of the Rays for second place in the AL East. “It’s been really tough,” Rothschild said, via NJ.com. “It’s been tough on them, tough on the team. But it’s my responsibility to get it right.”On Saturday, it was CC Sabathia who didn’t play well as he allowed five runs in 4 1/3 innings at Fenway Park. His reliever, Chad Green, didn’t fare much better — he allowed four runs in 2 1/3 innings. Related Newslast_img read more