CFO Focus: More on the future of floating rates

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Originally utilized in 1969, LIBOR—the London Interbank Offered Rate—was officially adopted by the British Bankers Association in 1986 as a benchmark rate and has subsequently become the global standard for the rate at which banks lend to one another. LIBOR rates are set by banks daily, with each bank providing the estimated rate at which it expects to borrow funds at a series of maturities (as well as a variety of currencies, which has led to Euro and Yen LIBORs, among others).The presence of such a robust interest-rate setting process led market participants to adopt LIBOR rates as the basis for a wide variety of financial products. Current estimates place LIBOR as the reference rate in over $200 trillion of active financial contracts in the cash and derivatives markets. LIBOR exposure can most commonly be found in the investment portfolios of banks and credit unions in the form of variable rate mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations.With no guarantee that LIBOR will continue to be published as of the end of 2021, global financial regulators have drafted plans to facilitate floating rates in the post-LIBOR world. In the United States, the Alternative Reference Rates Committee has chosen the secured overnight funding rate as the replacement for LIBOR, and in our previous article we discussed the differences between the two benchmarks and the challenges to a smooth transition. Fannie Maeand Freddie Mac have recently released a joint playbook and timeline outlining the LIBOR transition, which should help ensure a smooth transition from LIBOR to SOFR. continue reading »last_img read more

USC takes down Stanford in convincing fashion

first_imgUSC coach Kevin O’Neill waited almost two years to break the streak, but as the old adage goes, all streaks are made to be broken.The Trojans (15-12, 7-7), who hadn’t beaten back-to-back road opponents since former coach Tim Floyd’s squad defeated the Oregon schools on Jan. 24 and Jan. 26 2008, took down the Stanford Cardinal 69-53 on Saturday night at Maples Pavilion, completing their two-game sweep of the Bay Area schools.Coupled with Thursday night’s win over California 78-75, USC snapped their eight-game streak of road futility with the help of junior forward Nikola Vucevic’s double-double (19 points and 14 rebounds) and a rare burst of offensive consistency from senior Alex Stepheson, who scored 15 points on 6-of-9 shooting from the field.For the second straight night, USC played hard for the entire 40 minutes on the defensive end, limiting Stanford (13-13, 6-9) to 33 percent shooting and 17 percent from beyond the three-point arc.After trailing 12-8 four minutes into the first half, the Trojans went on a 22-4 run over a nine-minute span and led at halftime 40-31.Stanford’s junior forward Josh Owens, who finished with 13 points and seven rebounds, cut the gap to seven with a quick basket to the start the second half, but a 10-0 run sparked by a Stepheson dunk and Vucevic three-point shot pushed the lead up to 17, and the Trojans never looked back.For the second straight game, senior guard Donte Smith started in place of freshman guard Maurice Jones.The move paid off Saturday night too, as Smith and Jones provided scoring balance for USC’s offense, scoring 13 and 10 respectively.In a losing effort, the Cardinal were led by Owens and freshman forward Josh Huestis’ play off the bench. Huestis put in a career-high 11 points in 19 minutes of action.The win for USC not only ended their woes away from home, but put them in a tie for fourth place in the Pac-10 standings with Oregon, while Stanford dropped to eighth in the conference.While dreams of dancing in March are still long shots for both teams, the top six teams from the conference get a bye in the first round of next month’s conference tournament at Staples Center.USC returns home next week to face No. 13 Arizona (23-4, 12-2) at the Galen Center.After their thrilling 87-86 win over Washington on Saturday afternoon, the Wildcats sit alone atop the conference heading into their 7:30 p.m. contest with the Trojans on Thursday night.last_img read more

Play Fair Code strengthens Austrian sporting practices with Sportradar

first_imgShare Björn Nilsson: How Triggy is delivering digestible data through pre-set triggers August 28, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Sportradar combats social media abuse with player protection solution August 17, 2020 Submit David Lampitt, Sportradar: F1 presents betting’s most sizeable opportunity August 14, 2020 The Austrian Play Fair Code (PFC) has signed a memorandum of understanding with Sportradar, designed to bring a multitude of benefits to its many stakeholders.Amongst those are the exchange on knowledge and best practices focussed towards education and prevention, which is to aid the strategic objective of fighting corruption across all forms of sport, both within Austria and on a worldwide basis.Also through the strengthening of ties between the two, a “mutual coordination and support” of efforts and advocacy before international and European authorities and institutions is to be achieved.Andreas Krannich, Sportradar’s Managing Director of Integrity Services, explained: “We are very proud to be sharing our expertise with the Play Fair Code. The information we can provide from our monitoring and detection system including our advanced intelligence, investigation, education and consultancy will cover all bases. “Combined with PFC’s in-depth expertise in the education field, this approach will see us mutually focus on eliminating potential corruption across sporting codes.”Operating on a day-to-day basis under its PFC moniker, the firm was founded by the Austrian Sports Ministry, Austrian Football Association (AFA) and Austrian Football League, under the collective name Association for Protecting the Integrity in Sports.A number of Austrian sporting stakeholders are encapsulated, such as the Austrian Federal Sports Organisation, the Austrian Olympic Committee, the Austrian Ski Federation, the Bookmakers’ Federation, the Austrian Lotteries, the Austrian Ice Hockey League, the Austrian Basketball League, as well as a range of Austrian betting providers.Günter Kaltenbrunner, Play Fair Code President, said: “We are very pleased to strengthen our relationship with Sportradar. We are both united in our aims and our joint efforts will ensure that we can be more confident in helping to diminish the risks of potential manipulation in sports across Austria.”Play Fair Code CEO, Severin Moritzer, added: “After nearly five years of a constant and fruitful relationship, we are now happy to take a next important step in this mutually beneficial cooperation.” Related Articleslast_img read more