Endangered caribou get provincial help

first_imgA new review process will potentially protect boreal woodland caribou habitat across parts of the province from new land sales.The Resource Review Areas will protect approximately 500,000 hectares of the province’s caribou range for the next five years when it will be reviewed.According to the Ministry of Energy, Mines, and Petroleum Resources, the “boreal caribou populations will be closely monitored” during the five-year period and population and habitat requirement indicators will be developed.- Advertisement -Despite the new RRA, the First Coal Corporation is still going to be able to develop on parts of the caribou’s protected range area because they already hold a tenure and undergoing an environmental assessment to have a mine near Chetwynd.First Coal says, however, that it has “already moved its activities away from the western windswept, high elevation ridges which constitute the highest value early winter caribou habitat.”The company says its planned mining process will allow the land to be more easily returned as close as possible to its original state once its activities are completed.Advertisement Approximately 1,500 boreal woodland caribou range within British Columbia. Under the federal Species at Risk Act, the population is currently listed as threatened and in British Columbia, the species is red-listed which means they are currently threatened or endangered of becoming extinct.last_img read more

MHA asks citizens not to use plastic national flags

first_imgNew Delhi, Aug 13 (PTI) Two days ahead of Independence Day, the Centre has urged all citizens not to use national flags made of plastic and asked the states and the union territories to ensure strict compliance of the flag code.In an advisory to states and union territories, the Home Ministry said the national flag represents hopes and aspirations of the people of India and hence should occupy a position of honour.The ministry said it has been brought to its notice that during important events, the national flag made of plastic is used in place of paper flags.Since plastic flags are not biodegradable like paper flags, they do not get decomposed for a long time and ensuring appropriate disposal of national flag made of plastic commensurate with the dignity of the flag, is a practical problem, the advisory said.The advisory is issued every year ahead of Independence Day and Republic Day. The ministry had also issued the advisory on August 8.According to Section 2 of ‘The Prevention of Insults to National Honour Act, 1971’ – Whoever in any public place or in any other place within public view burns, mutilates, defaces, defiles, disfigures, destroys, tramples upon or otherwise shows disrespect to or brings into contempt (whether by words, either spoken or written, or by acts) the Indian National Flag or any part thereof, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to three years, or with fine, or with both.The advisory said on important national, cultural and sports events, flags made of paper only are to be used by public in terms of the provisions of the ‘Flag Code of India, 2002’ and such paper flags are not to be discarded or thrown on the ground after the event.advertisementSuch flags are to be disposed of, in private, consistent with the dignity of the flag. Wide publicity for not using the national flag made of plastic should be made along with its advertisement in the electronic and print mediaState governments, UT administrations, secretaries of all ministries and departments of government of India were told to ensure strict compliance of the provisions contained in the ‘Flag Code of India, 2002’ and ‘The Prevention of Insults to National Honour Act, 1971.There is universal affection and respect for and loyalty to the national flag. Yet, a perceptible lack of awareness is often noticed amongst people as well as organisations and agencies of the government in regard to laws, practices and conventions that apply to ‘display of the national flag’, the advisory said. PTI ACB ACB DIVDIVlast_img read more